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Folic Acid
Best Type Of Calcium Supplement
Health Benefits From Eating Garlic
Vitamin A
Vitamin D
Vitamin E
Vitamin K
Vitamin B-1
Vitamin B-2
Folic Acid
Vitamin B-12
Pantothenic Acid
Bioten
Vitamin C
Calcium
Phosphorus
Magnesium

 

FOLIC ACID





Q: My wife recently read that women need to take in a higher level of folate than the recommended dietary allowance. Do men also need more than they're getting?


A: Folic acid, or folate, taken in adequate amounts by women prior to conception or during the first trimester of pregnancy, significantly reduces the risk of neural tube, or spinal, defects in their babies. Men don't need to increase their folate consumption. The present RDA for women of childbearing age is 0.18 milligrams per day
The United States Public Health Service now recommends that women get 0.40 milligrams per day. This amount should reduce the risk of neural tube birth defects by more than 50 percent. Most women take in about 0.20 milligrams. Women can increase the amount of folate in their diets by supplementation-most low-dosage multivitamins provide 0.4 milligrams of folic acid-or food fortification; but you should avoid excessive intake, as there are problems associated with megadosing on this nutrient. Foods that re high in folate include leafy green vegetables, sprouts and orange juice.
Feb93IM

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BEST TYPE OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENT



Q: What is the best type of calcium supplement?

A: While there are many calcium supplements on the market, dietary sources of calcium offer the highest utilization and bioavailability. Nonfat dairy products are your best bet. In terms of supplements, amino acid chelates, with compounds of minerals, such as calcium, and amino acids in an easily absorbed form, are probably best. Calcium containing antacid preparations, such as Tums, provide available calcium; however, antacids that contain aluminum magnesium hydroxides, such as Rolaids, can accelerate calcium losses.

Be wary of bone meal (crushed magnesium carbonate, a compound found in limestone and marble that is powdered and sold as a calcium-magnesium supplement), as both are poorly absorbed, are often contaminated with toxic materials and can interact adversely with absorption of other essential minerals. Oyster shells are also powdered and sold as calcium supplements, but these, too, are not well absorbed by the digestive system.

As mentioned above, your best bet for a calcium supplement is an amino acid chelate of calcium. Remember however, that if you are also taking an iron supplement, take them at separate times during the day, since calcium inhibits iron absorption.
Aug91IM

 

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HEALTH BENEFIT FROM EATING GARLIC





Q: Is there any health benefit from eating garlic, or will it just make my skin and breath smell?

A: Garlic is one of the most popular herbal panaceas. Numerous studies since the early '70s have examined evidence that garlic influences risk factors for heart disease, but there is still great debate as to whether it will do you any good if you ingest it in large amounts. Although manufacturers would like you to believe otherwise, it in no way helps prevent or limits the symptoms of colds.

Many preparations on the market contain garlic oil of unknown composition that has been rendered tasteless and odorless. Since most of the active principles of garlic are odoriferous, you would be wise to question the usefulness of these products. You should also be aware of possible side effects: Garlic can induce a contact dermatitis and produce severe vomitting and diarrhea, marked weight loss, anorexia, stomach damage, flatulence, garlicky body odor and nausea. While it's perfectly fine to cook with garlic, it's probably best to avoid megadosages and over-the counter garlic preparations as a cur-all for what ails you.
March91IM

 

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VITAMIN A




Vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin with an RDA for adults set at 800RE for females and 1000RE for males. The major dietary sources for Vit. A are fat containing and fortified dairy products, liver. provitamin carotene in orange and deep green fruits and vegetables. The major functions of Vitamin A. is a component of rhodopsin; carotenoids can serve as antioxidants, retinoic acid affects gene expression, still under intense study. Some signs of severe, prolonged deficiency are night blindness, keratinization of epithelial tissues including the cornea of the eye(xerophthalmia) causing permanent blindness, dry, scaling skin, increased susceptibility to infection. Some signs of extreme excess of performed vitamin A are damage to liver, bone, headache, irritability, vomiting, hair loss, blurred vision, 13-cis retinoic acid: some fetal defects, and carotenoids: yellow skin.

 

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VITAMIN D



Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin with an RDA for adults under 25 years of 10 micrograms, and 5 micrograms for adults over 25 years. The major dietary sources are fortified and full-fat dairy products and egg yolk (diet often not as important as sunlight exposure). The major functions are to promote absorption and use of calcium and phosphorus. Some signs of severe, prolonged deficiency are rickets (bone deformities) in children, and osteomalacia (bone softening) in adults. Some signs of extreme excess are calcium deposition in tissues leading to cerebral, CV, and kidney damage.

 

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VITAMIN E



Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin with an RDA of 8 tocopheral equivalents for females and 10 tocopheral equivalents for males. Some major dietary sources are vegetable oils and their products: nuts and seeds. Some major functions are antioxidant functions to prevent cell membrane damage (still under intense study). Some signs of severe, prolonged deficiency are possible anemia and neurological effects. Some signs of extreme excess are generally nontoxic, but at least one type of intravenous infusion led to some fatalities in premature infants; may worsen clotting defect in vitamin K deficiency.

 
 

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VITAMIN K



Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin with an RDA for females under 25 of 60 micrograms and 65 micrograms for females over 25. The RDA for males under 25 is 70 micrograms and 80 micrograms for males over 25. Some major dietary sources are green vegetables and tea. Its major functions are to aid in the formation of certain proteins, especially those for blood clotting. Some sign of severe, prolonged deficiency are defective blood coagulation causing sever bleeding on injury. Some signs of extreme excess are liver damage and anemia from high doses of the synthetic form manadione.


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VITAMIN B-1




Thiamin is a water-soluble vitamin with an RDA of 1.1mg for females and 1.5 for males. Some major dietary sources are pork, legumes, peanuts, enriched or whole-grain products. Some major functions are coenzyme functions used in energy metabolism. Some signs of severe, prolonged deficiency are nerve changes, sometimes edema, heart failure and beriberi. Some signs of extreme excess are generally nontoxic, but repeated injections may cause shock reaction.

 

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VITAMIN B-2




Riboflavin is a water-soluble vitamin with an RDA of 1.3 mg for females and 1.7 mg for males. Some major dietary sources are dairy products, meats, eggs, enriched grain products, green leafy vegetables. Some major functions are coenzyme functions used in energy metabolism. Some signs of severe prolonged deficiency are skin lesions. Some signs of extreme excess are generally nontoxic.


 

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FOLIC ACID


 


Folic acid is a water-soluble vitamin with an RDA of 180 micrograms for females and 200 micrograms for males. Some major dietary sources are green vegetables, orange juice, nuts, legumes, and grain products. Some major functions are coenzyme functions used in DNA and RNA metabolism and single carbon utilization. Some signs of severe, prolonged deficiency are megaloblastic anemia (large, immature red blood cells), and GI disturbances.


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VITAMIN B-12




Vitamin B-12 is a water-soluble vitamin with an RDA of 2 micrograms. Some major dietary sources are animal products. Some major functions are coenzyme functions used in DNA and RNA metabolism, and single carbon utilization. Some signs of sever, prolonged deficiency are megaloblastic anemia, pernicious anemia when due to inadequate intrinsic factor, and nervous system damage. Some signs of extreme excess are thought to be nontoxic.

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PANTOTHENIC ACID




Pantothenic acid is a water-soluble vitamin with an RDA of 4-7 mg. Some major dietary sources are animal products and whole grains; widely distributed in foods. Some major functions are coenzyme functions used in energy metabolism. Some signs of severe prolonged deficiency are fatigue, numbness, and tingling of hands and feet. Some signs of extreme excess are thought to be nontoxic, but occasionally causes diarrhea.



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BIOTIN





Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin with an RDA of 30-100 micrograms. Some major dietary sources are widely distributed in foods. Some major functions are coenzyme functions used in energy metabolism.

Some signs of severe, prolonged deficiency are thought to be nontoxic.

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VITAMIN C






Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin with an RDA of 60mg. Some major dietary sources are fruits and vegetables, especially broccoli, cabbage, cantaloupe, cauliflower, citrus fruits, green pepper, kiwi fruit, and strawberries. Some major functions are in synthesis of collagen, its an antioxidant, aids in detoxification, improves iron absorption, (still under study). Some signs of severe, prolonged deficiency are scurvy, petechiae (minute hemorrhages around hair follicles), weakness, delayed wound healing, and impaired immune response. Some signs of extreme excess are GI upsets, and confounds in certain lab tests.

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CALCIUM


 




Calcium is a major mineral with an RDA of 1200 mg for ages 19-24, and 800 mg for 25 and older. Some major dietary sources are milk, cheese, dark green vegetables, and legumes. Some major functions are bone and tooth formation, blood clotting, and nerve transmission. Some signs of severe, prolonged deficiency are stunted growth; perhaps less bone mass. Some signs of extreme excess are depressed absorption of some other minerals; perhaps kidney damage.


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PHOSPHORUS


 



Phosphorus is a major mineral with an RDA of 1200 mg for ages 19-24, and 800 mg for 25 and older. Some major dietary sources are milk, cheese, meat, poultry, and whole grains. Some major functions are bone and tooth formation, acid-base balance, and component of coenzymes. Some signs of severe, prolonged deficiency are weakness, and demineralization of bone. Some signs of extreme excess are depressed absorption of some minerals.


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MAGNESIUM






Magnesium is a major mineral with an RDA of 280 mg for females and 350 mg for males. Some major dietary sources are whole grains and green leafy vegetables. Some major functions are component of enzymes. Some signs of severe prolonged deficiency are neurologic disturbances. Some signs of extreme excess are neurologic disturbances.
 

 

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